Taking cues from nature to advance salmon restoration

Some more great research and “lessons learned” about restoring Atlantic salmon stocks.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

This is the fourth feature in a five-part series that follows an Atlantic salmon on its journey upstream to spawn in a tributary of Lake Champlain driven by its instincts (and a pickup truck). Learn why this species disappeared from the lake in the 19th century, and how it is making a comeback today thanks to collaboration by partners in the basin.

“I want you to see this structure out here because it has really informed our thinking about the effects of barriers on fish movement,” said U.S. Geological Survey Research Ecologist Theodore Castro-Santos as we walked across the snow-covered grounds of the Silvio O. Conte Anadromous Fish Research Center in Turners Falls, Mass., to check out what appeared to be a swimming pool connected to a long cylinder wrapped in plastic.

“This is the Aquatic Biomechanics and Kinematic Research Station. We call it ABiKiS.”

dsc03464 USGS Research Ecologist Theodore Castro-Santos with ABiKiS…

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Driven by instincts and a pickup truck: An Atlantic salmon’s journey towards recovery — U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

Reblogged from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Blog….

That’s how many Atlantic salmon make their way to spawning habitat in Lake Champlain’s tributaries nowadays. Learn why this species disappeared from the lake in the 19th century, and how it is making a comeback today thanks to collaboration by partners in the basin.

via Driven by instincts and a pickup truck: An Atlantic salmon’s journey towards recovery — U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

Virginia rivers opened for the first time in 100 years!

Damn fine work here helping with native fish restoration.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

Colonial leaders got it right for fish … and people too.

As far back as 1670, Virginia prohibited structures like dams that would hinder fish migrating up and down our rivers. Why? They recognized their future depended on the millions of delicious migratory fish swimming our coastal rivers. Fish biologist Albert Spells will tell you that feasting on Atlantic sturgeon saved the first permanent English colony in America at Jamestown.

1-albert-spells-with-an-atlantic-sturgeon-caught-on-the-chesapeake-bay Albert Spells with an Atlantic sturgeon caught on the Chesapeake Bay. Credit:USFWS

Flash forward to the 1900s, and the rivers paint a different picture. The growing cities and towns have built hundreds of dams and road culverts blocking fish from their spawning grounds. Commercial fishing has expanded rapidly to feed the region and the world. Fish numbers drop, and keep dropping.

Where does that put us today? Well much has changed on the Chesapeake Bay and the rivers that flow to…

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